Home Interior
Home Exterior
Electric
Plumbing
Appliances
Tools
Landscaping
Interior Design
Directory
Site Map
Home



 

Faux Rag Painting

Rag painting usually involves 2 colors, one is your base coat, which may be your existing wall color. The other coat is a glaze coat that may be ragged “on” or ragged “off”. See our article on Faux Painting for more information on glaze, color, and the look you want to achieve. You can rag“ON’ for a marbled effect, or rag“OFF” for a more muted effect, similar to suede.

Tools: Buckets, paint tray, rollers, small paint brush, spray bottle, sea rags or paper towels, ladder, stirring stick.

Ragging “ON”
Apply your base coat and allow to dry. You may use store bought glazes or make your own by mixing 1 part paint to 1 ˝ parts water, and 1 cup water based polyurethane to 1 gallon mix.

You may add 1 part paint to 2 parts water for a more transparent look.

Tip: Practice your technique on cardboard before you begin. Paint your base coat on the cardboard, allow to dry. Dip your damp rag into the glaze and pat onto the base coat. This will give you an idea of the eventual color and pattern you wish to achieve, and will prevent you doing a whole wall over because you don’t like the color.

Technique: Dampen your rag with water and wring out excess. I have found that I like using paper towels, as they are easy to wring out and you can throw them away when they get too much glaze on them. I recommend using rubber gloves for this technique. Simply dip your rag into the glaze and gently pat off excess onto a rag or paper towel, leaving very little glaze on the rag. You don’t want to use a lot of glaze or it will look gloppy. Start in one corner and gently tap the wall with your rag, turning it in all directions to get a random look. Frequently re-scrunch the rag to create a random look. You can also roll the rag onto the wall, but I found this more difficult to do than patting it. Once you have started, you need to complete the whole wall at the same time. Do a 3x3 foot area at a time, and overlap your areas, keeping in mind you want to overlap an area while it is still wet. Do the whole wall, then step back to see if you need to go over any areas. You can cut a small piece of sponge or rag and tape it to a screwdriver or pencil to get into tight areas. If you are not happy with your finished wall, play with it; adding more or less color. You can add another color to make it richer, darker, grayer, more golden, or whatever you wish. If your walls are darker than you imagined them to be, add a little cream or white to the glaze and blot over in a random pattern.

Ragging “OF
In this technique, glaze is painted on an entire section of wall and ragged off, leaving a small amount of glaze on the wall. You may use store bought glazes or make your own by mixing 1 part paint to 1 ˝ parts water, and 1 cup water based polyurethane to 1 gallon mix. You may add 1 part paint to 2 parts water for a more transparent look.

Tip: Practice your technique on a cardboard before you begin. Paint your base coat on the cardboard and allow to dry. Next paint over your base coat with glaze and gently dab at the glaze with a wrung out rag. This will give you an idea of the eventual color and pattern you wish to achieve, and will prevent you doing a whole wall over because you don’t like the color.

Technique: Use a roller and start at the top corner of wall, painting a 3x3 section. Dampen your rag with water, and wring out excess. I like to use paper towels, as they are easy to wring out and you can throw them away when they get too much glaze on them. I recommend using rubber gloves for this technique, or you will have paint under your nails that you cannot get out. Starting at the outer edges, gently dab at the glaze so there are no harsh edges, and continue dabbing to the middle of the section, continually rotating your rag to obtain a random effect. You will be removing glaze from the wall, leaving a pattern behind. Continue doing 3x3 foot sections, overlapping the color and making sure the glaze does not dry in between. If the glaze does start to dry before you have gotten to it, mist the wall with a spray bottle of water. You will have to rinse your rag in warm water occasionally to get rid of excess glaze. Be sure to wring it out before you begin the ragging off technique.

Do the whole wall as quickly as you can to prevent overlapping dried areas. . You can cut a small piece of sponge or rag and tape it to a screwdriver or pencil to get into tight areas. If you are not happy with your finished wall, play with it; adding more or less color. If your walls are darker than you imagined them to be, add a little cream or white to the glaze and blot over in a random pattern.
 
 
 
 





 



eHomeResource.com
Home Tips &
Related Articles

Faux Painting Technique
Sponge Painting

 
 
 
 
 

Send Us Your
Home Repair Tips

Appliance Reviews
Submit A Review

Tool Reviews
Submit A Tool Review